Science / Technology

Scientists Have Discovered a 380 Million-Year-Old Heart

Scientists Have Discovered a 380 Million-Year-Old Heart
Scientists Have Discovered a 380 Million-Year-Old Heart
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Scientists were excited by a 380-million-year -old fish heart found buried in a pile of Australian sediment . This heart may also provide important clues about the evolution of jawed vertebrates .

The heart belonged to an extinct class of armored, jawed fish called arthrodires that flourished during the Devonian period between 419.2 million and 358.9 million years ago . Despite the fish’s very archaic nature, the location of its two-chambered S-shaped heart prompted researchers to observe surprising anatomical similarities between ancient swimmers and modern sharks.

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Scientists Have Discovered a 380 Million-Year-Old Heart

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Heart Sheds Light on the Evolution of Jaws

“Evolution is often thought of as a series of small steps, but these ancient fossils show a larger leap between jawless and jawed vertebrates ,” said Kate Trinajstic , a vertebrate paleontologist at Curtin University in Australia and co-author of a new study . said. “The hearts of these fish are literally in their mouths and under their gills, just like sharks today ,” Trinajstic said . he added.

Paleontologists encountered the fossil during an expedition to the GoGo Formation in 2008, and it adds to a wealth of information gathered from the field, including information on the origins of teeth and the transition from fin to limb. The GoGo Formation, a sedimentary deposit in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, is known for its rich fossil record preserving reef life from the Devonian to the Paleozoic era, including remnants of tissue as delicate as nerves and embryos with umbilical cords .

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